Commons Concerns - KAIT-Jonesboro, AR-News, weather, sports

Commons Concerns

Common Concerns

If you are thinking about bariatric surgery and have doubts about whether it is right for you, you're not alone. It's a life-changing decision, and serious contemplation—particularly overcoming concerns and learning how to effectively cope with them—is part of the decision-making process for everyone.

Paying for Surgery

For many people, bariatric surgery is affordable because it is covered by their health insurance plan. People who do not have insurance coverage for bariatric surgery must pay for it on their own. This is called self-pay or cash-pay. Many  gastric bypass patients often consider paying for their own surgery and consider it a critical investment in theirhealth.

Whether you have health insurance or opt for self-pay, you will need to prepare detailed written documentation. From diet history to co-morbid conditions, this information will come in handy.

Working with Health Insurance

Many people find dealing with health insurance companies to be intimidating and are not sure how to even get started. If your bariatric surgeon recommends surgery, consider the following:

– Your best resource for how to deal with your health insurance company may be your bariatric program. Many bariatric programs have patient advocates who work on your behalf with your health insurance company.

– Read your Certificate of Coverage (COC). A COC describes your insurance policy in detail, including what it covers and what it excludes.

– Write down your weight loss history. Go as far back as you can and include diets and exercise programs. If possible, pull together receipts for gym memberships and weight loss programs.

 

Work with Your Bariatric Program

Assistance is key. It is critical that you work with your bariatric program to determine the correct approach to appealing a denial. Your program is there to assist you and to help you adhere to your policy's requirements.

Tip

Write a description of how morbid obesity decreases the quality of your life. Be sure to include details such as difficulty walking, socializing, or maintaining personal hygiene. This documentation can be useful for your bariatric program and health insurance company.

For more assistance, call 870.932.4875.

How to Advocate for Coverage

Health insurance is one of the most common benefits offered by employers. Large employers often have self-funded health insurance and decide which health services and procedures are covered under their policy.

If this is the case, there are steps you can take if your employer has decided not to include bariatric surgery as a covered benefit.

 

Meet with a Human Resources Representative

Take time to meet with someone from Human Resources to find out why bariatric surgery is not covered. Share your story and how you believe bariatric surgery will benefit not only you, but your organization as well.

It may be helpful to bring information about the many benefits of bariatric surgery—such as increased energy levels and decreased health issues—which can translate into savings for the employer.

Educate Coworkers 

Getting coverage approved by an employer can be a time-intensive process. Take the time to educate your coworkers about the surgery and its importance. By educating your coworkers, you're not only fighting society's obesity bias, but you also may find other people interested in bariatric surgery. 

 

How to Cope with Surgical Risks and Physical Changes

It's normal and natural to fear surgery, anesthesia, or physical changes. But before you let these fears prevent you from having bariatric surgery, you may want to take a few moments to better understand the facts.

Fear and Risks of Surgery

This is a common fear. After all, bariatric surgery is major surgery performed while you're under general anesthesia. Complications can occur. Keep in mind that you'll have a team of healthcare professionals dedicated to your best possible care.

Keep in Mind

        Advances in bariatric surgical technique have significantly lowered the risk of operative mortality—especially when surgery is performed by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon.1

        During the past decade, patient outcomes from general anesthesia have improved significantly, so that the mortality rate is down, from one in 10,000 to one in 250,000 patients.27 Each patient's anesthesiology risk during bariatric surgery is based on the patient's overall health.

 

Compare the benefits of bariatric surgery to the risks, and then talk to Dr. Jones about your options.

Fear of Physical Changes

For people who have spent years living with morbid obesity, bariatric surgery sounds like a lifesaver. But, some people are concerned about changing their body. It's understandable. Your surgeon will reduce the size of your stomach so that you are able to be satisfied with less food and, depending on the procedure, absorb fewer calories and nutrients.

Compare the benefits of bariatric surgery to the risks, and then talk to Dr. Jones about your options.

Be sure to share your concerns with your bariatric surgeon and your bariatric program's mental health professional

They will be able to provide you with information to help you deal with your concerns.

And Remember…

Bariatric surgery is a lifelong change. Even considering it is a healthy step, because it gives you an opportunity to examine your health and your life.

Tips

        Research surgeons and bariatric programs: Research your surgeon and program online. Attend different bariatric programs' support groups and talk to patients to find out their take on the surgeon and the program.

        Talk to your surgeon: Be honest when speaking with your surgeon. Tell him or her about your fears. Ask about the bariatric program's complication and mortality rates.

How to Cope with Recovery

Bariatric surgery is a major procedure, and recovery doesn't happen overnight. It's important to follow your surgeon's postoperative recovery instructions.

Discomfort and PainYou may think that recovering from bariatric surgery will be a long and painful process—but, that's not usually the case.

The majority of patients have minimally invasive, or laparoscopic, surgery. Surgeons who use a minimally invasive approach create four to five small incisions.

Compared to open surgery, minimally invasive surgery offers:

        A shorter hospital stay

        Faster recovery

        Less pain

        Less abdominal trauma

        Less scarring

 

If you're concerned about pain after surgery, speak with Dr.Jones office. They will discuss the pain management medications that he or she will provide you with after the surgery. Some patients are provided with a system that allows them to control their pain medication with the push of a button.

Being out of Commission

As with any major surgery, there will be a recovery period. Recovery periods vary from patient to patient and depend on the type of surgery you have.

One study found that laparoscopic gastric bypass patients typically:

        Left the hospital on the second day

        Returned to work at 21 days

 

Take the time to follow your surgeon's instructions. For examples of what recovery might be like.

And be sure to use this time to practice healthy habits, such as diet and exercise.

And Remember…

Your health is worth the time it takes to fully recover. Try not to rush it. After all, your body will be healing from surgery.

ry and how you believe bariatric surgery will benefit not only you, but your organization as well.

It may be helpful to bring information about the many benefits of bariatric surgery—such as increased energy levels and decreased health issues—which can translate into savings for the employer.

Educate Coworkers

Getting coverage approved by an employer can be a time-intensive process. Take the time to educate your coworkers about the surgery and its importance. By educating your coworkers, you're not only fighting society's obesity bias, but you also may find other people interested in bariatric surgery.

 

How to Cope with Surgical Risks and Physical Changes

It's normal and natural to fear surgery, anesthesia, or physical changes. But before you let these fears prevent you from having bariatric surgery, you may want to take a few moments to better understand the facts.

Fear and Risks of Surgery

This is a common fear. After all, bariatric surgery is major surgery performed while you're under general anesthesia. Complications can occur. Keep in mind that you'll have a team of healthcare professionals dedicated to your best possible care.

Keep in Mind

        Advances in bariatric surgical technique have significantly lowered the risk of operative mortality—especially when surgery is performed by an experienced laparoscopic surgeon.1

        During the past decade, patient outcomes from general anesthesia have improved significantly, so that the mortality rate is down, from one in 10,000 to one in 250,000 patients.27 Each patient's anesthesiology risk during bariatric surgery is based on the patient's overall health.

 

Compare the benefits of bariatric surgery to the risks, and then talk to Dr. Jones about your options.

Fear of Physical Changes

For people who have spent years living with morbid obesity, bariatric surgery sounds like a lifesaver. But, some people are concerned about changing their body. It's understandable. Your surgeon will reduce the size of your stomach so that you are able to be satisfied with less food and, depending on the procedure, absorb fewer calories and nutrients.

Compare the benefits of bariatric surgery to the risks, and then talk to Dr. Jones about your options.

Be sure to share your concerns with your bariatric surgeon and your bariatric program's mental health professional.
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