Blind High School Student Publishes Book - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Jonesboro--Heather Flanigan Reports

Blind High School Student Publishes Book

February 9, 2004 -- Posted at 2:37 p.m. CST

JONESBORO--For most people, publishing a book is a great achievement and often a major milestone in a career. But for one student at Nettleton High School, it's all in a few months work...and when you meet sophomore Corey Jones, you'll understand why.

Publishing a book is a great accomplishment, but when you're in high school it's even a bigger achievement...and factor in a disability, and you've got something nearly unbelievable.

"One quote in there pretty much sums it up," said Corey Jones, "even a white cloth can still bear stains."

The amazing thing is Jones is blind...but it didn't stop him from following his dreams.

"It wasn't hard at all. That made it easier because I didn't have to worry about paper and stuff or having to wait until I had the opportunity to get on the computer to do anything because I use this to do all of my school work as well. So whenever I had free time at school I could just go on and work on that," said Jones.

Corey's teachers say he is both academically and emotionally beyond his years.

Ms. Vickie Morgan said, "All of the students here in school accept him. We talk openly in class a lot of times the disability will come up in literature that we've read before, and he does a wonderful job and he'll even enlighten us with some of the things that he has his ideas about."

As a sophomore, Jones just took the ACT test and scored a 30...and he's already applied to the Arkansas School of Math and Science. In college, he hopes to study astronomy or physics, and eventually obtain a Ph.D.

"I think he will go as far as his imagination will let him, and he has quite an imagination. I can see him going to college and finishing and achieving any goal that he sets his mind to," said Morgan.

"I think the most important thing is to get everything to work out together in unity. To be able to do what you want and still carry out your education without them conflicting, and being able to maintain. Being the type of person you want to be and not be influenced by everything, and still get all that to work out together, instead of one being sacrificed at the expense of the other," remarked Jones with wisdom beyond his years.

It's an out look on life that takes most folks a lifetime to realize. Excerpts from Corey's book are available on the Internet at www.1stbooks.com

  • Region 8 News</span><a class="customMoreLink" href="/Global/category.asp?C=4391" target="_top">More >></a>Region 8 NewsMore>>

  • State awards school for academic success

    State awards school for academic success

    Monday, April 24 2017 7:43 PM EDT2017-04-24 23:43:21 GMT
    Monday, April 24 2017 8:57 PM EDT2017-04-25 00:57:02 GMT
    (Source: KAIT-TV)(Source: KAIT-TV)

    One Mississippi County school received a special gift from the state for excelling in academics.

    One Mississippi County school received a special gift from the state for excelling in academics.

  • The Latest: Inmate seeks stay, citing attorney's plagiarism

    The Latest: Inmate seeks stay, citing attorney's plagiarism

    Monday, April 24 2017 6:20 PM EDT2017-04-24 22:20:54 GMT
    The Latest on Arkansas' attempt to carry out the nation's first double execution since 2000: (all times local):
    The Latest on Arkansas' attempt to carry out the nation's first double execution since 2000 (all times local):
  • breaking

    Arkansas executes Jack Jones

    Arkansas executes Jack Jones

    Monday, April 24 2017 8:25 PM EDT2017-04-25 00:25:45 GMT
    Monday, April 24 2017 8:33 PM EDT2017-04-25 00:33:53 GMT
    Jack Harold Jones Jr. (Source: Arkansas Department of Correction)Jack Harold Jones Jr. (Source: Arkansas Department of Correction)

    According to the Associated Press, Arkansas has executed Jack Jones by lethal injection, the first of what would be the only double-execution in the United States since 2000.

    According to the Associated Press, Arkansas has executed Jack Jones by lethal injection, the first of what would be the only double-execution in the United States since 2000.

Powered by Frankly