Study: Modifying television shows can improve kid’s behavior - KAIT-Jonesboro, AR-News, weather, sports

Study: Modifying television shows can improve kid’s behavior

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JONESBORO, AR (KAIT) - A recent study by USA Today shows that modifying what your children watch, could affect their behavior.

"Watching increased depictions of violent behavior can increase violent behavior in the child itself," said Families Incorporated Clinical Supervisor Joe Branch.

The first step to modifying what they watch is to be aware of the programs they choose.

"If a parent is involved with what their child is watching, they can better sculpt the types of programs they see towards an educational component and towards age appropriate entertainment," said Branch.

Sitting down with your children and interacting with them as they watch TV can also eliminate any negativity that could affect their behavior.

"One thing I tell all my parents is to talk with your children talk with them about what they are seeing, what they are watching and talk with them about their feelings," said Branch.

Also, let them know your feelings towards any violent or negative actions so they can understand what is okay and what isn't.

"Need to be aware of what their kids see, what they think, how they react and they need to know your opinion on it," said Branch.

The amount of violence a child will watch before they even reach middle school is as high as it's ever been.

"Children are going to see between six to eight thousand murders on TV before they finish elementary school," said Branch.

Violence is seen just about everywhere on TV so taking full control as a parent is the first step to how it affects your kids.

"It is your television, you are the parent and it is your home," said Branch. "There's no reason you shouldn't be aware and in charge of what your children are seeing."

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