New warning sirens likely for Louisville Metro - KAIT-Jonesboro, AR-News, weather, sports

New warning sirens likely for Louisville Metro

Posted: Updated:
The Louisville Metro Council appears poised to approve two new emergency warning sirens after a committee unanimously approved the measure. The Louisville Metro Council appears poised to approve two new emergency warning sirens after a committee unanimously approved the measure.
The sirens would be installed near the Parklands of Floyds Fork and Jefferson Memorial Forest. The sirens would be installed near the Parklands of Floyds Fork and Jefferson Memorial Forest.
April Kirk April Kirk

LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - The Louisville Metro Council appears poised to approve two new emergency warning sirens after a committee unanimously approved the measure.

The sirens would be installed near the Parklands of Floyds Fork and Jefferson Memorial Forest. Both areas are outside Interstate 265, or the Snyder Freeway, in rural areas not covered by the current warning system.

Jefferson County's 120 existing sirens reach all but about 6 percent of the county's population, Louisville Metro data indicate.

"I've been through tornadoes before as a kid, and luckily, we heard the sirens and were able to take cover, because it did knock part of our house down," said April Kirk, who lives in Taylorsville but commutes to work in Louisville. "I think those sirens are important to save lives."

State funding would pay for the $149,000 cost of the project, according to the ordinance filed on Metro government's website.

The Public Safety committee approved the measure without opposition a week ago, and Metro Council could OK the project soon.

Emergency preparedness officials are also working to upgrade the 120 existing warning sirens with battery backups, said Steve Haag, a spokesman for the council's Republican caucus.

Nearly half of the sirens don't have battery backups now, according to a map on Metro government's website. A first line of storms could knock out power to those sirens, rendering them useless if a second storm comes through without electricity being restored.

Still, sirens are meant to warn people who are outside, WAVE 3 Chief Meteorologist Kevin Harned said. People inside their homes can't always hear sirens, and should make sure to have a weather radio, he said.

To see the map of existing sirens, click here.

Copyright 2013 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow

472 Craighead Co. 766
Jonesboro, AR 72401
(870) 931-8888

FCC Public File
publicfile@kait8.com
(870) 336-1816
EEO Report
Closed Captioning

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and KAIT. All Rights Reserved.
For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service.