Obstetrics and Gynecology Q & A - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

NEA Clinic Directory

Obstetrics and Gynecology Q & A

Below are our archive of questions and answers in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Question 6/16/2002: I am looking into a tubal ligation reversal. Is there a doctor here in Ar. that does this? If so, where and the cost. I have a friend that had it done, but have been unable to contact her about the details as of yet. If you could help me with this I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you

Answer: We are frequently asked about the option of having the fallopian tubes surgically put back together after a previous tubal ligation has been performed.  Most frequently this occurs as a result of a change in relationship or change in the couple's desire for further children.  The patient must keep in mind that at the time of her original decision her doctor was trying to do his best to provide her with contraception so that she would not be able to conceive in the future.  Because of this, somewhat with the type of procedure that was used to tie the tubes in the first place.  Also, the length of fallopian tube that remains impacts the success rate of a tubal reversal procedure.

Generally, when a patient's tubes are tied immediately after a delivery she has had the type of procedure where a small segment of tube has actually been removed and the ends tied.  This is usually fairly easy to reverse and information can be obtained from the old operative report that we can assist you in obtaining.

Another type of tubal that is performed at a time distant from a delivery usually with an instrument called a laparoscope.  Different methods are used through the laparoscope, the most common being an elastic band or a clip. Again, this type of tubal is usually readily reversible.  The most difficult type of tubal to reverse is one where electricity is used to cauterize the tube.  That doesn't mean that they cannot be reversed, it just means that more tube is damaged and our results are usually less successful. The reversal surgery itself is done as an outpatient to try to reduce costs. Most insurance companies do not pay for this type of surgery or the hospitalization related to it.  A small incision is made just above the pubic bone and over 90% of our patients are able to go home the afternoon after surgery.  The surgical procedure itself can last anywhere from one to two hours. Healthy couples without any type of infertility issues are typically said to have a 90% likelihood of conceiving a pregnancy within one year.  Obviously, with your tubes tied that is 0%.  We usually tell our patients that if we get a successful surgery our typical success rate with reanastomosis is approximately 50%.

There are a few other considerations one must discuss when making a decision like this.  One is that with tubal surgery there is an increased chance of tubal pregnancy that could require additional surgery and is sometimes life threatening.  Also, medical conditions tend to occur as we get older and as our patients seeking reanastomosis tend to be somewhat older than our typical OB patient, medical problems associated with age such as hypertension and diabetes can be more likely during their subsequent pregnancy.  There is also an increased risk of certain birth defects after age 35 that need to be considered.

These points are meant to provide an overview for the patient considering tubal reanastomosis.

Dr. Mark Stripling of the NEA Women's clinic provides this service. 870-972-8788

 

Question 5/25/2002: My boyfriend was fingering me one night and mentioned that he felt something hard in there. What could this be?
Answer: In the female anatomy the vaginal opening is soft on each side (labia) and posterior (toward the rectum is the perineum); anterior however, is the pubic bone, which would have a hard texture. NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 5/23/2002: Should I be concerned when I have severe pain in my left ovary when I reach sexual climax?
Answer: If you are experiencing significant pains every time that you have intercourse, you need to get a pelvic exam and possibly a pelvic ultrasound to rule out any ovarian diseases or infections.

 

Question 5/13/2002: My menstrual cycle has always been irregular & since intercourse I have a reoccurring pain in my pelvis, it feels like a pulling or twisting sensation when I walk, get up, sit down it's really painful & then it passes. What should I do, or what should I look for (cancer runs in my family) so I don't want to be overly anxious, but I don't want to ignore something serious either. Thank you in advance.
Answer: I would recommend a pelvic ultrasound to evaluate your ovaries & uterus. Ultrasound can also identify any potential ovarian cancer. NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 5/7/2002: I have a HIGH sex drive; however, I am unable to achieve orgasm. I took Paxil for more than a year. Stress level is low and my relationship is wonderful, except for my sexual problem.
Answer: You didn't say if you had never had an orgasm but assuming that you have and you are no longer taking any medications I would expect that the learned pleasurable activity of achieving an orgasm can be duplicated if you and your partner set aside the time to identify pleasuring points and activities with not expectation of penetration. Some women seldom have an orgasm during penile vaginal intercourse but can have orgasm separate from their partners. NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question: I have a couple of questions. Can a gynecologist tell if a girl is a virgin by performing an internal exam? Correct me if I'm wrong: You are no longer a virgin when your hymen is broken. Where is your hymen located and is it possible to break it with out having sex? Would a gynecologist send a virgin to have a transvaginal ultrasound? Thanks for your help
Answer: A gynecologist cannot always tell if a female is a virgin by performing an internal exam. Virginal status only refers to penile penetration not to the status of the hymen. The hymen can be broken without penile penetration having occurred. If the transvaginal ultrasound will fit in the vagina it could be used to determine the status of the hymen, which would not necessarily determine virginal status. Women who use tampons are potential candidates for this procedure even if virginal.
NEA Clinic - (870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

 

Question: It's 9 days until my period is supposed to be here. However, on the 14th, 18th, 20th, and 21st, I've had spotting. Could I be pregnant?
Answer: If you're not using contraception of some type, then there is a possibility of pregnancy. However, your bleeding is most likely break through bleeding due to reduced progesterone hormone since ovulation. This occurs occasionally and unless it persists for 2-3 cycles usually resolves on its own. A urine pregnancy test might reassure you but I would wait until after May 1 to check one. If the problem persists or becomes associated with unusual pain you need to see your doctor.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question: Me and my husband have been trying to have a baby but 3 yr. ago I had my gallbladder taken out does that have anything do with that?
Answer: No, it does not.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question: I had to have a d&c in September due to miscarriage. I was wondering why it is difficult to achieve orgasm with my boyfriend. I have had irregular periods for several months and am now on the shot, but I have been extremely emotional and hard to get along with any suggestions. I am at wits end.
Answer: From the limited information you have given I believe your problems have resulted from the sharp hormone change after your miscarriage. Because of the length of time and the severity of your emotional complain you should immediately consider going on anti-depressants, just as you might need for post partum depression. Depression and emotional upheaval will limit your ability to achieve orgasm. Treat the first and expect the second to improve.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question: My husband and I have been trying to conceive a child for almost 3 years. I have tried Clomid, Glucaphauge, and also sub q injections for ovulation. I have also tried the ovulation monitor with no success. We have had my husband's sperm checked and everything is ok. What other medicines can we try to get me to ovulate?
Answer: There are multiple injectables available. Would recommend appointment to Reproductive Endocrinologist at UAMS to evaluate.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question: My husband’s sperm ct is 230 Million with good mobility, so after using Clomid for several years on and off, nothing works, is there a stronger drug than Clomid with fewer side effects?
Answer: I would recommend further testing or procedures if you have tried more than 6 months of Clomids. The possible procedures include intrauterine insemination, hystosalpingogram, Laparoscopy or IVF. You may consider revisiting your OB doctor for the above treatments. Good luck.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question: My husband and I have been trying to conceive for over 9 years with no success, I had been taking Clomid on and off for over 3 years with no luck. My Ob-Gyn was checking me for cyst on my ovaries while on Clomid she found none; but when I went to my family doctor complaining of some pain he found a 9.5 cm cyst on my left ovary, he took the ovary. It’s been 4 months my cycle seems to be right but no luck getting pregnant. Any suggestions? Besides Clomid?
Answer: There are two more fertility pills available on the market. They are fairly expensive. Have you completed fertility testing including ovulation, sperm count, tubal potency & post-coital testing? We may also perform intrauterine insemination in this office if you are an appropriate candidate.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 4/5/2002: How long does it take for your stitches to dissolve after having a baby?
Answer: 6 weeks, at least.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 3/31/2002: My wife and I are having another child and we have decided not to have anymore. She wants me to have a Vasectomy and I am scared to death of that! She is also scared to have her tubes tied? She is worried that she would have to have a hysterectomy later since some of her aunts by blood had to have it not soon after they had there tubes tied, which would be better me or her, If you say it would be easier for me to do it ill be scared to death of it, but I will do it. What do you think what would be safer?
Answer: Out patient vasectomy is an office procedure with an approximate two-day recovery. Laparoscopic sterilization for females is a hospital procedure with up to two weeks recovery. I would suggest that the partner most certain of not desiring further children should have the permanent sterilization.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 3/28/2002: I am 21and I have been on BC for 4 years. I have been off for about 4 months. I have told I have endometriosis. I have had severe pain on both sides, and it runs down my back. A heating pad is the only thing that seems to help. My husband and I want to have a child, but the pain is pretty bad. It has seemed to get worse since I have been off the pill. What should I do?
Answer: There is a surgical treatment for endometriosis called Laparoscopy. This is an out patient procedure. It can treat your pains as well as evaluate any damages to your pelvis, as a result of endometriosis. Therefore, this procedure can increase your fertility.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 3/22/2002: I am 24 yrs old & have Polycystic ovarian syndrome. My husband and I have a 2 year old and recently have decided to try to have another child. My doctor has put me on Glucaphauge 500mg 2 times a day. I have never heard of this, and I'm wandering if this is a new treatment? What are the success rates of it? My 1st baby I had to use Dexamethazone and Clomid. Also I have heard of a fertility monitor that is digital. Where can I find information on them? How do they work?
Answer: 1. Glucaphauge is not a new treatment. 2. You may need to use Dexamethazone and Clomid again; see your doctor. 3. Refer to www.FertilityTrends.com
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 3/13/2002: I have been taking the oral contraceptive, Ortho Tri-Cyclen, off and on about 6 years. I am curious if this could somehow interfere with my libido?
Answer: For most patients taking oral contraceptives (especially low dose like Ortho Tri-Cyclen) there is little or no change in libido. If there is increased libido on the week of non-hormone pills consider asking your doctor to change to an ultra low dose pill.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 3/11/2002: My wife recently quit taking birth control pills, what, if any symptoms may occur, she is complaining of being hot then cold
Answer: She may be pre-menopausal. She'll need to see her doctor to determine this.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 3/4/2002: I have been having irregular menstrual & abdominal swelling for 12 years and lots of pain too, low stomach pains sometimes up to months of swelling, sometimes a few days. I had my exam in November of 2001, came back normal. I take Provera and the problem still stays. What can I be wrong with me and what can I do about it. I have searched for answers since I was 24. Please help me, if you can.
Answer: Possibly Irritable Bowel Syndrome; also sounds like a hormonal imbalance. Recheck with your doctor.
NEA Clinic - (870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/26/2002: I have two pap smears in the last 6 months that have come back abnormal. My doctor wants to wait 6 more months to do another pap smear. Should I wait or see another doctor.
Answer: It depends on the degree of abnormality on your pap smear. If your pap smear shows dysplasia, I would recommend seeing GYN doctor for colposcopy & to treat this condition. A colposcopy is to perform a biopsy for diagnostic testing.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/24/2002: Can a woman who had a tubal (6 yrs ago) get pregnant? Can she have her tubes untied? And if so, are there any doctors around the Jonesboro area that will do this kind of surgery?
Answer: If the patient has not had a procedure done to reverse the tubal, it would be extremely unlikely she would become pregnant. We are frequently asked about the option of having the fallopian tubes surgically put back together after a previous tubal ligation has been performed. Most frequently this occurs as a result of a change in relationship or change in the couple's desire for further children. The patient must keep in mind that at the time of her original decision her doctor was trying to do his best to provide her with contraception so that she would not be able to conceive in the future. Because of this, the ability to reverse a sterilization procedure varies somewhat with the type of procedure that was used to tie the tubes in the first place. Also, the length of fallopian tube that remains impacts the success rate of a tubal reversal procedure. Generally, when a patient's tubes are tied immediately after a delivery she has had the type of procedure where a small segment of tube has actually been removed and the ends tied. This is usually fairly easy to reverse and information can be obtained from the old operative report that we can assist you in obtaining. Another type of tubal that is performed at a time distant from a delivery usually with an instrument called a laparoscope. Different methods are used through the laparoscope, the most common being an elastic band or a clip. Again, this type of tubal is usually readily reversible. The most difficult type of tubal to reverse is one where electricity is used to cauterize the tube. That doesn't mean that they cannot be reversed, it just means that more tube is damaged and our results are usually less successful. The reversal surgery itself is done as an outpatient to try to reduce costs. Most insurance companies do not pay for this type of surgery or the hospitalization related to it. A small incision is made just above the pubic bone and over 90% of our patients are able to go home the afternoon after surgery. The surgical procedure itself can last anywhere from one to two hours. Health couples without any type of infertility issues are typically said to have a 90% likelihood of conceiving a pregnancy within one year. Obviously, with your tubes tied that is 0%. We usually tell our patients that if we get a successful surgery, our typical success rate with reanastomosis is approximately 50%. There are a few other considerations one most discuss when making a decision like this. One is that with tubal surgery there is an increased chance of tubal pregnancy that could require additional surgery and is sometimes life threatening. Also, medical conditions tend to occur as we get older and as our patients seeking reanastomosis tend to be somewhat older than our typical OB patient, medical problems associated with age such as hypertension and diabetes can be more likely during their subsequent pregnancy. There is also an increased risk of certain birth defects after age 35 that need to be considered. These points are meant to provide an overview for the patient considering tubal reanastomosis. If you have further questions, then I would ask that you call our office to schedule and appointment where we may sit down face to face and address them.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/22/2002: I had a CT scan of the abdomen done about 4 months ago. It came back good. Can a lady have ovarian cancer, even if the CT Scan came back normal? Does ovarian cancer have to be a tumor or a mass of some kind? And what are the signs of ovarian cancer? Also when I have my period 2 or 3 days after wearing feminine products I get really raw and burn on the outside when I use the bathroom. Is this normal or could it be the brand of feminine products I'm using?
Answer: 1. CT Scan's are most accurate for late stage ovarian cancer. Pelvic ultrasound & blood work are more sensitive for early stage ovarian cancer. Unfortunately, ovarian cancer is somewhat difficult to screen in early stages. 2. Signs of ovarian cancer include pain, abdominal distension, and significant weight change. 3. I would change your feminine products to rule out any contact allergy with your body if you experience persistent reactions.
NEA Women's Clinic - (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/22/2002: Can you take birth control pills for 3 straight months without cycling without causing serious side effects?
Answer: You may, if you do not smoke. Yes, the birth control pill cycles every 28 days in order to be "natural". You may wish to shed the endometrium more often if you have break through bleeding.
NEA Women's Clinic (870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/22/2002: I had a CT scan of the abdomen done about 4 months ago. It came back good. Can a lady have ovarian cancer, even if the ct came back normal? Does ovarian cancer have to be a tumor or a mass of some kind? And what are the signs of ovarian cancer? Also when I have my period 2 or 3 days after wearing feminine products I get really raw and burn on the outside when I use the bathroom. Is this normal or could it be the brand of feminine products I'm using?
Answer: 1. Ovarian cancer most commonly presents as an atypical ovarian mass. Should you have cancer of the ovary it would be extremely early and not identifiable at this time. 2. If you have had vaginitis ruled out (yeast, etc.) then you should change brands.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/20/2002: I went to a doctor and was told that I have a hemorrhagic corpus luteal cyst and I would like to know what can be done about it, and what causes it.
Answer: This is a cyst, which occurs with ovulation. When the cyst ruptures, releasing the egg, occasionally a small blood vessel will burst causing bleeding into this cyst. It will resolve on its own.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/20/2002: I have been told I have cyst on my ovaries and I was wondering will that keep me from having kids.
Answer: No. Cysts on the ovary are usually normal. No woman can get pregnant without forming a cyst.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/18/2002: How safe is it to have your tubal ligation reversed. It was not my choice to have them tied and now I am divorced and would like to have another baby and can you tell me some doctor who might do the reversal for me.
Answer: We are frequently asked about the option of having the fallopian tubes surgically put back together after a previous tubal ligation has been performed. Most frequently this occurs as a result of a change in relationship or change in the couple's desire for further children. The patient must keep in mind that at the time of her original decision her doctor was trying to do his best to provide her with contraception so that she would not be able to conceive in the future. Because of this, the ability to reverse a sterilization procedure varies somewhat with the type of procedure that was used to tie the tubes in the first place. Also, the length of fallopian tube that remains impacts the success rate of a tubal reversal procedure. Generally, when a patient's tubes are tied immediately after a delivery she has had the type of procedure where a small segment of tube has actually been removed and the ends tied. This is usually fairly easy to reverse and information can be obtained from the old operative report that we can assist you in obtaining. Another type of tubal that is performed at a time distant from a delivery usually with an instrument called a laparoscope. Different methods are used through the laparoscope, the most common being an elastic band or a clip. Again, this type of tubal is usually readily reversible. The most difficult type of tubal to reverse is one where electricity is used to cauterize the tube. That doesn't mean that they cannot be reversed, it just means that more tube is damaged and our results are usually less successful. The reversal surgery itself is done as an outpatient to try to reduce costs. Most insurance companies do not pay for this type of surgery or the hospitalization related to it. A small incision is made just above the pubic bone and over 90% of our patients are able to go home the afternoon after surgery. The surgical procedure itself can last anywhere from one to two hours. Health couples without any type of infertility issues are typically said to have a 90% likelihood of conceiving a pregnancy within one year. Obviously, with your tubes tied that is 0%. We usually tell our patients that if we get a successful surgery our typical success rate with reanastomosis are approximately 50%. There are a few other considerations one most discuss when making a decision like this. One is that with tubal surgery there is an increased chance of tubal pregnancy that could require additional surgery and is sometimes life threatening. Also, medical conditions tend to occur as we get older and as our patients seeking reanastomosis tend to be somewhat older than our typical OB patient, medical problems associated with age such as hypertension and diabetes can be more likely during their subsequent pregnancy. There is also an increased risk of certain birth defects after age 35 that need to be considered. These points are meant to provide an overview for the patient considering tubal reanastomosis. If you have further questions, then I would ask that you call our office to schedule and appointment where we may sit down face to face and address them.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/9/2002: In July of last year, I was diagnosed with having "Internal Varicose Veins" around my female organs. They cause me a lot of pain especially at "that Time of the Month". What can be done about this? I have to go and see my gynecologist about every six months. Would it be better if they just removed my female organs or would it make it worse? I have worse cramps now than I did as a teenager. Help, what can I do?
Answer: I believe your question is about management of pelvic venous congestion syndrome and currently, in my opinion, that diagnosis alone is not an indication for Hysterectomy. You didn't say how the diagnosis was made and if there were any other associated findings or symptoms. There are some medical managements for the dysmenorrhea that need to be exhausted before considering surgery.
NEA Clinic
(870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/9/2002: I have been on birth control pills for 13 years. I recently had a tubal ligation done and was told by my surgeon that I did not need to continue my pills, unless I wanted to finish the month. I decided not to take the pills. Within 36 hours I began to have vaginal bleeding. I am unsure if this is normal or not. Is my body withdrawing from the pill? Or did I just start my period early? Or could it be because of the surgery? Should I restart the pills for a month?
Answer: The early withdraw bleeding is probably related to body adjustment with the surgery. I would stop the pills & observe your cycles. If the bleeding is prolonged or continues to be irregular, then I would reconsider starting back on your pills again.
NEA Clinic
(870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/5/2002: my husband and I are desperately trying to get pregnant. I was very sexually active in my younger days, and I would like to know if this makes a difference, and how can we go about getting pregnant? Is there any certain times we should be having sex, or anything we should do especially different?
Answer: Previous sexual activity & frequency will cause infertility. 80% of average couples should get pregnant by the end of 12 months. You may utilize ovulation-predicting kit from the pharmacy to predict the best timing for intercourse. If you have been trying for more than 12 months, you will need to see a Gynecologist for consultation.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 2/4/2002: Three years ago I had a baby and when he turned a month old I started to get severe stomach pain and nobody could help me or knew what my problem was. After a year went by, it finally went away but I lost 38 pounds and was very ill and now I have another baby and my pains are coming back is there anything I can do or do I have to do that all over again
Answer: Any new onset of stomach pain should be evaluated by your doctor. This could be the same problem you had before, but it could also be something else.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/31/2002: I had a Hysterectomy 5 yrs ago now I’m having small amount of bleeding with a lot of discharge.
Answer: Please see your OB/GYN physician soon.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/31/2002: I have had serious menstruation problems, since a tubal ligation, in 1992. I have heard of a possible reversal of this procedure. Can you tell me specifically what this would involve? Where would I find a Doctor who would be familiar with this procedure?
Answer: Tubal Reanastomosis (putting back together) is for reversal of sterility. Hysterectomy is for post-tubal syndrome. Dr. Mark Stripling does reversals out of all of the physicians at the NEA Women's Clinic.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/31/2002: My husband and I are trying to conceive and we have not had any luck. Is there anything you can suggest that might work? This is a serious question. Please help.
Answer: Try an ovulator predictor kit to time conception. Take folic acid every day. All prenatal vitamins have folic acid as well as most multi-vitamins. If you've tried for over a year you should see your OB/GYN physician for evaluation.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/30/2002: I am currently going through a divorce/custody battle. I have been on my period for over 3 weeks and I am taking birth control pills to regulate me. I have also been cramping on the left side where I have had my ovary removed. Should I be concerned?
Answer: Your stress may have contributed to the cycle irregularity. However, if your bleeding is not regulated by the pills, you need to go back to your GYN doctor for check-up. Excess & prolonged bleeding will lead to anemia & fatigue.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/30/2002: I had a D&C May 26 and Cervoplastmy 01. I am having very light bleeding light pink just when I wipe inside my vagina should I worry? Everything was ok. I haven't had any trouble, just can't afford to go to the doctor unless this is very serious.
Answer: We would need more information in order to answer your questions. What was the pathology report from the D & C? What is Cervoplastmy? Who did the D & C?
NEA Clinic
(870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/17/2002: I would like to know if there are any doctors in the area that does tubal ligation reversal and how much it would cost?
Answer: The physician fee at NEA Women's Clinic for tubal ligation reversal is $1,700. We are frequently asked about the option of having the fallopian tubes surgically put back together after a previous tubal ligation has been performed. Most frequently this occurs as a result of a change in relationship or change in the couple's desire for further children. The patient must keep in mind that at the time of her original decision her doctor was trying to do his best to provide her with contraception so that she would not be able to conceive in the future. Because of this, the ability to reverse a sterilization procedure varies somewhat with the type of procedure that was used to tie the tubes in the first place. Also, the length of fallopian tube that remains impacts the success rate of a tubal reversal procedure. Generally, when a patient\'s tubes are tied immediately after a delivery she has had the type of procedure where a small segment of tube has actually been removed and the ends tied. This is usually fairly easy to reverse and information can be obtained from the old operative report that we can assist you in obtaining. Another type of tubal that is performed at a time distant from a delivery usually with and instrument called a laparoscope. Different methods are used through the laparoscope, the most common being an elastic band or a clip. Again, this type of tubal is usually readily is one where electricity is used to cauterize the tube. That doesn’t mean that they cannot be reversed, it just means that more tube is damaged and our results are usually less successful. The reversal surgery itself is done as an outpatient to try to reduce costs. Most insurance companies do not pay for this type of surgery or the hospitalization related to it. A small incision is made just above the pubic bone and over 90% likelihood of conceiving a pregnancy within one year. Obviously, with your tubes tied that is 9%. We usually tell our patient that if we get a successful surgery, our typical success rate with reanastomosis is approximately 50%. There are a few other considerations one must discuss when making a decision like this. One is that with tubal surgery there is an increased chance of tubal pregnancy that could require additional surgery and is sometimes life threatening. Also, medical conditions tend to occur as we get older and as our patients seeking reanastomosis tend to be somewhat older than our typical OB patient, medical problems associated with age such as hypertension and diabetes can be more likely during their subsequent pregnancy. There is also an increased risk of certain birth defects after age 35 that need to be considered. These points are meant to provide an overview for the patient considering tubal reanastomosis. If you have further questions, then I would ask that you call our office to schedule an appointment where we may sit down fact to face and address them.
NEA Women's Clinic
(870) 972-8788 (for appointment)

 

Question 1/7/2002: I am a 42 year old over weight female. For the last 6-9 months I have had 11 - 14 days of menstruation, 14 days off & then back on again. What I want to know is; is this "Middle-aged" sign or could there be something I need to check out.
Answer: Certainly, this could be a sign of menopause, but there are other significant conditions that could cause this excessive bleeding. You need to see a gynecologist for an exam soon. Depending on the findings, there are many treatment options now available to make your life better.
NEA Clinic
(870) 935-4150 (for appointment)

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