Bossier community reacts to Supreme Court prayer ruling - KAIT-Jonesboro, AR-News, weather, sports

Bossier community reacts to Supreme Court prayer ruling

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Prayers happen in open government meetings across Bossier City and Parish. Prayers happen in open government meetings across Bossier City and Parish.
Council Member Jeffery Darby offers an invocation. Council Member Jeffery Darby offers an invocation.
BOSSIER CITY, LA (KSLA) -

The U.S. Supreme Court has given cities and towns across the country its blessing to hold prayers before official meetings, even if the majority of those prayers are from one faith.

Each Bossier City Council meeting starts with a prayer. Prayers also begin the Bossier Parish's police jury and school board meetings.

"Father God, who art in heaven, we thank you Lord God, for another day you have given us. We thank you Lord for those that are here in this place to hear the business of this city," prayed City Councilman Jeffrey Darby, who gave the invocation for Tuesday's meeting.

Prayers happen in open government meetings across Bossier City and Bossier Parish.

"Father, we thank you for all those that chose to serve, we ask that you bless them and keep them in your care," Darby prayed.

The Supreme Court says prayers before town council meetings don't violate the constitution, even if most of them are from the Christian faith.

Bossier City resident Veronica Parks believes they made the right decision.

"It's great to hear from a believer's perspective, that prayer is going to be allowed in those arenas," she said.

The court called the prayers ceremonial and in keeping with the nation's traditions, saying judges should not be in the business of censoring prayer.

However, four of the nine justices disagreed, afraid the ruling might favor one religion.

Rob Boston, a Washington D.C.-based advocate for separation of church and state told CBS News he is also against the ruling. "I think the Supreme Court has essentially given its blessing to majority rules prayer, and I think that's unfortunate," he said.

Bossier resident Georgette Price doesn't think the decision will change much about how cities and towns start their meetings.

"I think communities who support it and have already done it, will continue to do so, with the knowledge it's covered," she said. "I think communities who have not done it in the past will continue not to do it."

Advocates for the separation of church and state told CBS News that the ruling opens the door for new legal challenges.

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