Calculated tactics police use to stop a pursuit suspect - KAIT-Jonesboro, AR-News, weather, sports

Calculated tactics police use to stop a pursuit suspect

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Instead, Jeffersontown officers executed PIT maneuvers that brought a very dangerous situation to a safe conclusion Tuesday morning. (Source: WAVE 3 News) Instead, Jeffersontown officers executed PIT maneuvers that brought a very dangerous situation to a safe conclusion Tuesday morning. (Source: WAVE 3 News)
Frank Kubala (Source: WAVE 3 News) Frank Kubala (Source: WAVE 3 News)

RICHMOND, KY (WAVE) - Some of the tactics Jeffersontown police officers used to stop a suspect during Tuesday's pursuit may appear as if the officer just rammed their cruiser into the suspect's car. Instead, officers executed PIT maneuvers that brought a very dangerous situation to a safe conclusion.

It's a precise pursuit tactic. PIT maneuvers, precision immobilization technique, force fleeing vehicles to abruptly turn sideways which causes the driver to lose control.

[PREVIOUS STORY: Suspect facing 45 charges following 58-minute police pursuit]

However, Jeffersontown officers won’t learn PIT maneuvers at the Criminal Justice Training Academy in Richmond, Kentucky, according to Criminal Justice Training Operations Assistant Director Frank Kubala.

"There are places that do train that, but it has to be done where you have the resources to do that. When you're talking about hitting other vehicles and causing a crash, the cost of doing that in training would be very high," Kubala said.

The Department of Criminal Justice Training provides entry-level and in-service training for city and county police officers, sheriffs, deputy sheriffs, university police and airport police.

Kubala said outside vendors or consultants may instruct law enforcement agencies PIT maneuvers.

"Some aren't even allowed to pursue and some may not allow a PIT maneuver or ramming. We train more than 400 police agencies in Kentucky and there may be more than 400 different pursuit policies," Kubala said.

Every law enforcement agency or department has its own police pursuit policy. However, when an officer engages a suspect with a PIT maneuver, it's no longer a chase.

"That becomes a different issue than pursuit. It becomes a use of force issue," Kubala said.

Kubala declined to talk about what happened during Tuesday's pursuit, but he said every move is calculated to ensure safety of the officer, suspect and anyone nearby.

During a news conference Tuesday, Jeffersontown Police Chief Rick Sanders Sanders wouldn't comment on specifics of Tuesday's incident but said the department allows pursuits.

"We have the commanding officer on the set make a determination if the pursuit should continue. Some of the things we considered were traffic conditions, weather conditions, day or night, what the subject is wanted for. I was under the impression he was armed with a weapon. His intention was to end this in a shootout," Sanders said.

The Jeffersontown Police Department said only one cruiser suffered heavy damage due to hitting a pole Tuesday. The other units had paint scraped off but can be repaired.

Copyright 2014 WAVE 3 News. All rights reserved.

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