Privacy experts urge caution with Snap Spectacles - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Privacy experts urge caution with Snap Spectacles

Privacy advocates worry that Snap Spectacles could be used, purposely or inadvertently, to record people in compromising positions without consent or knowledge. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Privacy advocates worry that Snap Spectacles could be used, purposely or inadvertently, to record people in compromising positions without consent or knowledge. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

The company behind wildly popular Snapchat is hoping that new Snap Spectacles will catch on with the teenagers who prefer Snapchat over other social media platforms.

But privacy advocates worry that the glasses could be used, purposely or inadvertently, to record people in compromising positions without consent or knowledge.

"They can be recording someone in the wrong place," said Marc Lamber, an attorney and legal analyst at Fennemore Craig, P.C.

The danger, according to Lamber, is that the glasses make it easy to record people without their knowledge and that teenagers may not understand that people have a reasonable expectation of privacy in certain situations. Violating that expectation could result in legal action against the teen or his or her parents.

"They could be responsible civilly and criminally for doing that. So this is something that could live with a young person for a long time," said Lamber.

In Arizona, it is legal to for one party to a conversation to record another party in that conversation without that person's knowledge. But there are places where covert videotaping is illegal. Restrooms, dressing rooms and areas where people are undressed are examples.

If someone has a reasonable expectation of privacy, they may be able to file a civil lawsuit against someone else for photographing them without consent. A reasonable expectation of privacy exists in private spaces.

Lamber warns that if a teenager is not mature enough to understand these concepts, they may not be mature enough to use tech gadgets like Snap Spectacles.

"The most important thing from my perspective is for parents to be involved with their kids and know what their kids are doing," said Lamber.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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Morgan  LoewMorgan Loew is an investigative reporter at CBS 5 News. His career has taken him to every corner of the state, lots of corners in the United States, and some far-flung corners of the globe.

Click to learn more about Morgan .

Morgan Loew
CBS 5 Investigates

Morgan’s past assignments include covering the invasion of Iraq, human smuggling in Mexico, vigilantes on the border and Sheriff Arpaio in Maricopa County. His reports have appeared or been featured on CBS News, CNN, NBC News, MSNBC and NPR.

Morgan’s peers have recognized his work with 11 Rocky Mountain Emmy Awards , two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for investigative reporting, an SPJ First Amendment Award and a commendation from the Humane Society of the United States. Last fall, Morgan was inducted into the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Silver Circle, in recognition of 25 years of contribution to the television industry in Arizona.

Morgan is a graduate of the University of Arizona journalism school and Concord Law School. He is the president of the Arizona First Amendment Coalition and teaches media law and TV news reporting at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

When he’s not out looking for the next big news story, Morgan enjoys hiking, camping, cheering for the Arizona Wildcats and spending time with his family at their southern Arizona ranch.

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