Guns in the home can create hazards for kids, adults alike - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Guns in the home can create hazards for kids, adults alike

One recent study indicated that having a gun in the home can increase by 50 percent the likelihood someone in that home will die from a gunshot wound. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) One recent study indicated that having a gun in the home can increase by 50 percent the likelihood someone in that home will die from a gunshot wound. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, 25 children died from gunshot wounds across the state in 2014. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, 25 children died from gunshot wounds across the state in 2014. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
It is estimated that one of every three Arizona households has a firearm. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) It is estimated that one of every three Arizona households has a firearm. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
So far this year, no children have been injured in unintended shootings in Arizona. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) So far this year, no children have been injured in unintended shootings in Arizona. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America speaks to groups about the importance of making sure guns are properly secured and out of the reach of children. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5) Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America speaks to groups about the importance of making sure guns are properly secured and out of the reach of children. (Source: 3TV/CBS 5)
PHOENIX (3TV/CBS 5) -

One recent study indicated that having a gun in the home can increase by 50 percent the likelihood someone in that home will die from a gunshot wound.

While advocates on both sides argue over whether stats like that one are accurate or exaggerated, two numbers are not up for debate: 147 and 124. They are the numbers of children who were injured and killed in unintended shootings last year. All were considered preventable.

"We leave politics at the door and we simply talk about safety and about saving kids' lives," said Kathleen Noble, who works with an organization called Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America.

Noble speaks to groups about the importance of making sure guns are properly secured and out of the reach of children. She says it's not enough to be aware of the dangers a firearm in the home can pose to a child. Responsible gun owners need to make sure their weapons are secured at all times.

"They think they can't lock it up because they'll need it right away (in the event of a break-in or other emergency)," said Noble.

But the reality, she says, is that quick access safes are available at a reasonable cost.

[SPECIAL SECTION: Power of 2 | Empowering you to be safe]

"I bought one for under $100 on Amazon and it works great. It's biometric. It recognizes my fingerprint," said Noble.

Last year, eight children in Arizona suffered unintentional gunshot wounds. Two of them died.

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, 25 children died from gunshot wounds across the state in 2014. That includes unintentional shootings, suicides and murders.

Advocates like Noble believe even those deaths were preventable if adults properly secured the firearms that were used.

It is estimated that one of every three Arizona households has a firearm.

"I keep a gun in the home for protection," said Josh, whose last name we agreed to withhold so he could speak freely about his views on gun ownership.

"Education, I believe, is the number one key," he said.

Josh says he's been around guns his entire life, and his children have an educated respect for them. He keeps his firearms locked up in a safe most of the time, but he also carries a gun.

"I don't anticipate having to use it, but it's there in case I have to," said Josh.

So far this year, no children have been injured in unintended shootings in Arizona.

Copyright 2017 KPHO/KTVK (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

Morgan  LoewMorgan Loew is an investigative reporter at CBS 5 News. His career has taken him to every corner of the state, lots of corners in the United States, and some far-flung corners of the globe.

Click to learn more about Morgan .

Morgan Loew
CBS 5 Investigates

Morgan’s past assignments include covering the invasion of Iraq, human smuggling in Mexico, vigilantes on the border and Sheriff Arpaio in Maricopa County. His reports have appeared or been featured on CBS News, CNN, NBC News, MSNBC and NPR.

Morgan’s peers have recognized his work with 11 Rocky Mountain Emmy Awards , two regional Edward R. Murrow Awards for investigative reporting, an SPJ First Amendment Award and a commendation from the Humane Society of the United States. Last fall, Morgan was inducted into the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Silver Circle, in recognition of 25 years of contribution to the television industry in Arizona.

Morgan is a graduate of the University of Arizona journalism school and Concord Law School. He is the president of the Arizona First Amendment Coalition and teaches media law and TV news reporting at ASU’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

When he’s not out looking for the next big news story, Morgan enjoys hiking, camping, cheering for the Arizona Wildcats and spending time with his family at their southern Arizona ranch.

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