Jury Returns Guilty Verdict for Shooter of Jonesboro Attorney - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Jonesboro, AR -- Brandi Hodges Reports

Jury Returns Guilty Verdict for Shooter of Jonesboro Attorney

April 6, 2006 -- Posted at 7:14 p.m. CST

 

JONESBORO, AR -- A jury has reached a verdict in the case of Allen Evans.  He was on trial for the December 2004 shooting of former Judge Bill Webster.

 

The jury deliberated for just under an hour before coming back with a guilty verdict. 

 

Now more than a year after the devastating shooting, the Webster family has a semblance of closure.

 

“The jury found the defendant guilty of attempted capital murder in regards to the shooting of Judge Bill Webster.  They also gave him an additional fifteen years for use of a firearm in commission of that offense,” said Prosecutor Brent Davis.

 

Now Allen Evans is sentenced to spend a total of 45 years in prison.

 

“They also gave the most punishment that you can give for the offenses.  Obviously, the only thing that could have kept this from being capital murder was the toughness of Judge Webster, and the medical treatment that he was provided,” saidDavis.

 

Kaye Webster says her husbands’ survival after his shooting is nothing short of a miracle.

 

“It’s been a long, hard two years.  It’s been very hard, very stressful, and devastating to the family in many facets.  We’ve done ok with the Lord’s help,” said Kaye Webster.

 

After the shooting, Webster spent 6 months in the hospital.  He will never be fully recovered.

   

“I’m trying to not feel any way about him.  Kind of hard not to have any hard feelings though,” said Bill Webster.

 

Evans attorney Martin Lilly says he and his client aren't surprised by the outcome.

 

“He received a fair trial.  I think all the evidence was presented, and it's up to the jury to make these type of decisions,” said Martin Lilly.

 

Evans will now be transported to the Arkansas Department of Corrections.

 

This part of the nightmare is now over for the Webster family, but their lives will never be the same.

 

“Frankly, the end result of what this man did has caused problems for them that the end of this trial is not going to cure,” said Davis.

 

Allen Evans has 30 days to appeal his conviction.

 

After 11 years he will be eligible for parole.

 

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