Chronic Back Pain Maintenance - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Chronic Back Pain Maintenance

Standard treatment for disc slippage, a common cause of back pain, is surgical disc removal, an operation performed over 200,000 times a year. While this conventional approach may alleviate back pain, in the long run it can lead to more problems. Once a disc is removed or a joint fused, the likelihood of other discs deteriorating is increased because of the added stress on remaining discs. Most people rely on painkillers to cope even after they’ve had surgery, which is a sure sign that conventional treatments don’t address the real problem.

Back pain can be managed safely and, in most cases, inexpensively. In this report I will give you the tools you need to do just that.

Lubricate Your Joints

In How to Deal Simply with Back Pain and Rheumatoid Joint Pain, F. Batmanghelidj, M.D., of Falls Church, Virginia, attributes back pain, and even rheumatoid pain, to chronic dehydration. In the most basic terms, he says our backs hurt because our bodies are thirsty.

Alleviating chronic back pain won’t happen by simply drinking several glasses of water at one time. Pain indicates that you’ve been dehydrated for quite some time, and it will take several weeks of increased water intake for you to feel a difference.

The Whitaker Program calls for eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day, but for back pain I recommend increasing that to 10 to 12 glasses.

Minimize Stress on Your Back

Certain positions and postures can help keep your back healthy. For starters, maintain good posture at all times: head up, stomach pulled in, and neck, shoulders, and pelvis in a straight line. When you’re standing for long periods of time, rest on foot on a low stool to take some of the pressure off your lover back. Switch your “resting” foot every 10 minutes or so, and move around as much as you can.

Sitting puts more pressure on your back than any other position. Use a straight-backed chair that allows you to keep your knees slightly higher than your hips-use a stool if you need to. This applies to driving a car as well. Keep the back (this also works well when you’re traveling on an airplane). Whenever you have to sit for long periods of time, be sure to get up and stretch often.

REFERENCES

1. Gionis. Thomas, MD, JD, MBA, FICA, FRCS et al. The outcome of a clinical study evaluating the effect of nonsurgical intervention on symptoms of spine patients with herniated and degenerative disc disease is presented. Spinla Decompression, Orthopedic Technological Review, November/December 2003; Volume 5, Number 6: Pages cover, 36-39.

2. Eyerman, Edward, M.D. MRI Evidence of Nonsurgical, Mechanical Reduction, Rehydration and Repair of the Herniated Lumbar Disc. Journal of Neuroimaging Volume 8 / Number 2 April 1998

3. American Journal of Pain Management

4. Eyerman, Edward, M.D. MRI Evidence of Nonsurgical, Mechanical Reduction, Rehydration and Repair of the Herniated Lumbar Disc. Journal of Neuroimaging Volume 8 / Number 2 April 1998

5. Bigos S, et al. Acute Low Back Problems in Adults, Clinical Practice Guideline No.14. Rockville, MD: U.S. Public Health Service, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, AHCPR pub. No 95-0642, Dec.1994.

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