Not Getting Enough Sleep Can Cause "Monday Jet lag" - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Jonesboro, AR -- Brandi Hodges Reports

Not Getting Enough Sleep Can Cause "Monday Jet lag"

JONESBORO, AR -- During the summer break the school time sleep schedule goes out the window and many teens catch up on sleep when they can.

"I probably sleep too late and then in the afternoon I'm just kind of tired.  I don't know, I stay up too late for one," said teen Zach Nixon.

"It would be normal for a lot of teenagers to stay up late and get up late," said Dr. Jeffrey Cohen.

Dr. Cohen with the sleep lab at St. Bernards said this is what doctors refer to as "Monday jetlag".

"It sure feels good at the time but you're probably going to regret it later," said Cohen.

And it's not just for teens.  Sleeping in on the weekends can ''re-set'' your body clock causing you to have a jet-lagged feeling on Monday morning.  This feeling can last one to three days. 

"Go to bed at a certain time and just try to do it behaviorally.  Decide when you go to bed and then you can change it that way," said Cohen.

But many don't have the option to decide when to sleep they just sleep when they can.

"It does physically take it's toll over your body over time," said registered nurse Philip Faughn.

Faughn spent 12 years working the night shift as a registered nurse.

"When your body is saying go to sleep and everything around you says go to sleep that person has to work," said Cohen.

Faughn did eventually adapt to the shift but at a cost.

"I got to where I was doing with less sleep.  Five hours of sleep would suffice, it would be enough for me to function on," said Faughn.

But is that function always healthy function?

"If one pulls an ‘all-nighter' obviously they're going to be tired the next day, but their performance goes down and their cognitive skills just aren't as good," said Cohen.

That could include not only health workers but police officers, and fire fighters who work odd shifts.

People who do have to work on the over night shift can do some things to help their transition be a little easier.  You can wear dark sunglasses when you drive home from work to prevent the direct sunlight from hitting your eyes. It is recommended that you sleep in a dark room that has blinds or curtains that won't allow the sunlight in. 

During the summer break the school time sleep schedule goes out the window and many teens catch up on sleep when they can.

"I probably sleep too late and then in the afternoon I'm just kind of tired.  I don't know, I stay up too late for one," said teen Zach Nixon.

"It would be normal for a lot of teenagers to stay up late and get up late," said Dr. Jeffrey Cohen.

Dr. Cohen with the sleep lab at St. Bernards said this is what doctors refer to as "Monday jetlag".

"It sure feels good at the time but you're probably going to regret it later," said Cohen.

And it's not just for teens.  Sleeping in on the weekends can ''re-set'' your body clock causing you to have a jet-lagged feeling on Monday morning.  This feeling can last one to three days. 

"Go to bed at a certain time and just try to do it behaviorally.  Decide when you go to bed and then you can change it that way," said Cohen.

But many don't have the option to decide when to sleep they just sleep when they can.

"It does physically take it's toll over your body over time," said registered nurse Philip Faughn.

Faughn spent 12 years working the night shift as a registered nurse.

"When your body is saying go to sleep and everything around you says go to sleep that person has to work," said Cohen.

Faughn did eventually adapt to the shift but at a cost.

"I got to where I was doing with less sleep.  Five hours of sleep would suffice, it would be enough for me to function on," said Faughn.

But is that function always healthy function?

"If one pulls an ‘all-nighter' obviously they're going to be tired the next day, but their performance goes down and their cognitive skills just aren't as good," said Cohen.

That could include not only health workers but police officers, and fire fighters who work odd shifts.

People who do have to work on the over night shift can do some things to help their transition be a little easier.  You can wear dark sunglasses when you drive home from work to prevent the direct sunlight from hitting your eyes. It is recommended that you sleep in a dark room that has blinds or curtains that won't allow the sunlight in. 

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