Dry Weather Causes Dip In White River Basin Lake Levels, Boating Caution Advised - KAIT Jonesboro, AR - Region 8 News, weather, sports

Dry Weather Causes Dip In White River Basin Lake Levels, Boating Caution Advised

LITTLE ROCK - Recent hot, dry weather has caused lake levels to dip in recent weeks at five Army Corps of Engineers lakes in the White River basin in northern Arkansas and southern Missouri.  With the approach of Labor Day weekend, the agency is advising boaters to use extra caution and be alert for potential hazards. 

Beaver Lake is 4.8 feet below conservation pool.  Bull Shoals is 3.4 feet below conservation pool.  Greers Ferry is 4.4 feet below conservation pool.  Norfork is 4.4 feet below conservation pool.  Table Rock is 4.1 feet below conservation pool.  

There is water for boating and other activities, but officials urge extra precautions.  Stay in main river channels, and give the shoreline a wide berth.  Some areas may harbor obstacles just below the surface such as stumps, land points or rock formations that are usually deep under water. 

Slow down, wear life jackets and use depth finders.  Check with local marinas about trouble spots.  Be especially careful at night.  Boaters are encouraged to stay on the side of a lake with bluffs since water is usually deeper.  Gradually sloping shorelines can indicate shallow water depth.  A change in water color can indicate a change in depth.  Lighter color often indicates shallower water. 

Dock owners should monitor their docks closely and move them as needed to prevent them from being grounded.

These lakes are performing as they should during dry weather, providing water storage that is creating benefits for taxpayers.  The lakes are designed to get low when too little rain has fallen as the water is used to generate electricity, provide drinking water supply, provide fish and wildlife habitat, and offer other benefits.

For more information about the lake levels, log onto the Internet at www.swl.usace.army.mil and click "Water Management."  The Corps manages these lakes and the surrounding public lands to meet the needs of human and natural communities for present and future generations.
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