Jupiter glows like a jack-o’-lantern in stunning new images

‘We used a very powerful technique called lucky imaging’

Jupiter glows like a jack-o’-lantern in stunning new images
This image combines three different ways of looking at Jupiter, using different wavelengths of light. (Source: International Gemini Observatory/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA M.H. Wong UC Berkeley, CNN)

(CNN/Gray News) – The world is getting a stunning new look at Jupiter and it has a bit of a jack-o'-lantern glow.

It all comes courtesy of the Juno spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope, and Hawaii’s Gemini North telescope.

Observations from this stellar “dream team” have produced stunning images and revealed what's happening inside Jupiter’s giant, continuous storms.

The images combine three different ways of looking at Jupiter, using different wavelengths of light.

Hubble observes visible and ultraviolet. Gemini captures thermal infrared. Juno records radio signals from lightning in Jupiter’s storms.

“We used a very powerful technique called lucky imaging,” said research team leader Michael Wong.

With lucky imaging, a large number of very short exposure images are obtained and only the sharpest images, when the Earth’s atmosphere is briefly stable, are used, according to the Gemini Observatory.

Those are combined to create the stunning images we’re seeing now.

“It’s kind of like a jack-o'-lantern,” Wong said. “You see bright infrared light coming from cloud-free areas, but where there are clouds, it’s really dark in the infrared.”

Scientists say they’ll use the imagery to track weather patterns on Jupiter.

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