HEALTH ALERT: Skin cancer risks increase amid Summer weather

Dr. Henry Wong, a dermatologist for UAMS in Little Rock, said there are several different types...
Dr. Henry Wong, a dermatologist for UAMS in Little Rock, said there are several different types of skin cancers that could affect you.(Pixabay)
Published: Jul. 19, 2022 at 8:19 PM CDT
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LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (KARK/KAIT) - The increased sunlight and hotter temperatures are creating more opportunities for people to enjoy the outdoors, but the combination is also creating a serious health risk.

The risks of skin cancer are more apparent than ever as more people get outside. Alisha Curtis, who has experienced skin cancer personally, said it’s something that can’t be ignored.

Content partner KARK spoke with Curtis about her experience.

She said it all began over a year ago when her step-mom encouraged her to go to the dermatologist. As a result of that visit, Curtis had seven moles removed.

“The next day I got a call from her directly, and all seven of them were cancerous,” she said.

Curtis also found out she had melanoma on her arm, KARK said.

Dr. Henry Wong, a dermatologist for UAMS in Little Rock, said there are several different types of skin cancers.

He explained melanoma is the most serious, while non-melanoma cancers have a low risk of growing and spreading unless you leave them untreated for years.

“Being outside, we are subjected to ultraviolet rays from the sun and that will induce damage to the skin,” Dr. Wong told KARK.

He suggested to try and avoid sun damage by wearing sunscreen, covering your body, specifically your arms and neck, and avoiding being in the sun from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. if possible.

For melanoma, Dr. Wong said some warning signs would be dark spots you notice growing, changing color in some parts, as well as itching or burning.

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